Old Editorial Touts Newspapers As ‘Wave of the Future’

Recently I came across an editorial that I wrote for The MetroWest Daily News, the newspaper that I interned at in high school and freelanced for during winter breaks in college.

Reading the editorial, which I wrote in July 2006, the summer before senior year, made me laugh. It’s clear that I was overly optimistic about the fate of newspapers and that I was determined to change the way people thought about them. (Hey, I didn’t get voted “Most Optimistic” and “Most Likely to Change the World” in high school for nothing!)

I know that it’s not realistic to think that I can save newspapers. I still consider them a part of my daily routine and would like to see them survive. I don’t, though, think that “newspapers are the wave of the future for aspiring journalists” as I wrote in the piece.

In retrospect, I think my argument was more so that there will always be a need for news: “In a an ever-changing field that continues to become more competitive,” I wrote, “there lies a glimmer of hope for young journalists, who can rest assured that the thrill of writing and reporting will never get old.”

Different parts of the editorial make me laugh, such as the fact that the headline, “Tenore: Wave of the Future,” makes it seem as though I’m the wave of the future. Other parts, such as the unnecessary cliches, make me cringe: “Most journalists are used to living life in the fast lane.” And then there is a typo in the kicker: “In a an ever-changing field that continues to become more competitive, there lies a glimmer of hope for young journalists, who can rest assured that the thrill of writing and reporting will never get old.”

Re-reading your old work is such a good way to see how you’ve grown — as a person, a self-editor and a writer. Thankfully, I’ve grown up a little since writing the wave of the future editorial.

Published by Mallary Tenore Tarpley

Mallary is a mom of two young kiddos -- Madelyn and Tucker. Mallary absolutely loves being a mom and often writes about the need to find harmony when juggling motherhood and work. Mallary is the Assistant Director of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin, where she manages the Center's various programs related to distance learning, freedom of expression, and digital journalism. Previously, she was Executive Director of Images & Voices of Hope and Managing Editor of The Poynter Institute’s media news site, Poynter.org. Mallary grew up outside of Boston and graduated from Providence College in Rhode Island. In 2015, she received a certificate in nonprofit management from Duke University. She now lives in beautiful Austin, Texas, with her kids, husband Troy and cat Clara. She's working on a memoir, slowly but surely. You can reach her at mjtenore@gmail.com.

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